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ABOUT

Dr Samuel Larner

Senior Lecturer in Linguistics I hold a BA (Hons.) in Linguistics from Lancaster University, an MA (Distinction) in Forensic Linguistics from Cardiff University, and a Ph.D. in Forensic Linguistics from Aston University. I am a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, a member of the International Association of Forensic Linguists, and a member of the British Association for Applied Linguistics. My experience in forensic linguistics spans over ten years. I joined Manchester Metropolitan University in 2015 where I teach a range of modules in linguistics at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. I have also held lectureships at the University of Central Lancashire and Newman University as well as giving guest lectures in the Czech Republic and Germany. As a research-active academic, I have presented the findings of my research at international conferences. Before lecturing, I was appointed to the role of Senior Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at Lancaster University.

CONSULTANCY

Forensic Linguistics  Forensic Linguists provide evidence during police investigations, and serve the courts as expert witnesses (for prosecution and defence) in civil and criminal trials where some aspect of language is an issue. I offer consultancy in establishing whether a language crime has been committed (e.g. bribery, threat, malicious offensive communication), ascertaining the likely meaning of what a suspect said, and determining the author of written texts (e.g. letters, e-mails, social media posts, text messages). This includes identifying whether a suspect wrote a document (e.g. blackmail, hatemail, terrorist materials), linguistically profiling the author of anonymous texts (such as threats and ransom demands), and assessing the authenticity and credibility of a range of texts such as suicide notes and wills. Please contact me if you would like some advice on whether a forensic linguist could contribute to your case.
RESEARCH INTERESTS Establishing the limits of forensic linguistics evidence My research interests lie primarily in investigative forensic linguistics, with a specific focus on the theory and practice of authorship analysis. My Ph.D. research explored the different ways in which authors use formulaic sequences (prefabricated sequences of words believed to be stored as holistic units) with a view to developing a robust marker of authorship. Since being awarded my PhD (2013), my research has focussed on developing and evaluating methods of authorship analysis and exploring the limits of evidence. A particular interest is in the role of individual variation and the extent to which idiolect (the individual choices and habits an author makes) remains stable across time. I am also interested in linguistic approaches to deception detection. Helping children through forensic linguistics analysis My latest research explores the language and linguistic strategies that children and young people use when disclosing that they have been sexually abused, since research suggests that their linguistic capabilities may limit the extent to which they can make a full and clear disclosure. This is problematic from a safeguarding perspective since the recipeient of the disclosure may not fully appreciate what the child is trying to disclosure, or even that a disclosure of sexual abuse is being made. Using data provided by NSPCC ChildLine, my research aims to determine the language and linguistic strategies used by children and young people during initial disclosures so that trusted adults can more readily recognise when a disclosure is being made. A full list of my publications can be found on my Manchester Metropolitan University home-page and on academia.edu, and you can hear me talking about my research on this podcast. Please contact me if you are interested in research collaboration or postgraduate level research opportunities in forensic linguistics (MPhil and PhD).
NAVIGATION
SOCIAL
ADDRESS Department of Languages, Information & Communications Geoffrey Manton Building Manchester Metropolitan University Manchester, M15 6LL United Kingdom
CONTACT enquiry@samuellarner.co.uk +44 (0)161 247 3922

Phraseology in Legal and

Institutional Settings

Do authors use sequences of words consistently and distinctively enough across a range of texts to enable a questioned document to be correctly attributed? This book chapter explores the potential role of phraseology in authorship analysis.  
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Corpora

Is it possible to identify formulaic sequences if they are specific to just one author? This article tests a method for identifying idiolectal formulaic sequences, and tests whether they are used distinctively enough to be useful for forensic authorship purposes.

Royal Society Open

Science

In this article, my colleagues from Lancaster University and I begin to explore the question of whether cultural background affects deceptive behaviour by examining cultural differences in linguistic cues to deception.
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Corpora

For the international, peer-reviewed journal Corpora, I compiled and edited a special edition, which showcases cutting-edge research at the intersection of forensic linguistics and corpus linguistics.  
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Forensic Authorship

Analysis and the WWW

Forensic Linguists sometimes use the web to determine the rarity of words and phrases. My first book argues that this is an unreliable method and that more caution should be used when producing evidence of this kind.

International Journal of

Speech, Language and the

Law

Can authors be identified by the idioms, clichés, and everyday phrases that they use? My peer- reviewed article, published in the official publication of the International Association of Forensic Linguists, argues that this may be the case for some authors.
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NAVIGATION
SOCIAL
ADDRESS Department of Languages, Information & Communications Geoffrey Manton Building Manchester Metropolitan University Manchester, M15 6LL United Kingdom
CONTACT enquiry@samuellarner.co.uk +44 (0)161 247 3922

Dr Samuel Larner

Senior Lecturer in Linguistics I hold a BA (Hons.) in Linguistics from Lancaster University, an MA (Distinction) in Forensic Linguistics from Cardiff University, and a Ph.D. in Forensic Linguistics from Aston University. I am a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, a member of the International Association of Forensic Linguists, and a member of the British Association for Applied Linguistics. My experience in forensic linguistics spans over ten years. I joined Manchester Metropolitan University in 2015 where I teach a range of modules in linguistics at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. I have also held lectureships at the University of Central Lancashire and Newman University as well as giving guest lectures in the Czech Republic and Germany. As a research-active academic, I have presented the findings of my research at international conferences. Before lecturing, I was appointed to the role of Senior Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at Lancaster University.

CONSULTANCY

Forensic Linguistics  Forensic Linguists provide evidence during police investigations, and serve the courts as expert witnesses (for prosecution and defence) in civil and criminal trials where some aspect of language is an issue. I offer consultancy in establishing whether a language crime has been committed (e.g. bribery, threat, malicious offensive communication), ascertaining the likely meaning of what a suspect said, and determining the author of written texts (e.g. letters, e-mails, social media posts, text messages). This includes identifying whether a suspect wrote a document (e.g. blackmail, hatemail, terrorist materials), linguistically profiling the author of anonymous texts (such as threats and ransom demands), and assessing the authenticity and credibility of a range of texts such as suicide notes and wills. Please contact me if you would like some advice on whether a forensic linguist could contribute to your case.
RESEARCH INTERESTS Establishing the limits of forensic linguistics evidence My research interests lie primarily in investigative forensic linguistics, with a specific focus on the theory and practice of authorship analysis. My Ph.D. research explored the different ways in which authors use formulaic sequences (prefabricated sequences of words believed to be stored as holistic units) with a view to developing a robust marker of authorship. Since being awarded my PhD (2013), my research has focussed on developing and evaluating methods of authorship analysis and exploring the limits of evidence. A particular interest is in the role of individual variation and the extent to which idiolect (the individual choices and habits an author makes) remains stable across time. I am also interested in linguistic approaches to deception detection. Helping children through forensic linguistics analysis My latest research explores the language and linguistic strategies that children and young people use when disclosing that they have been sexually abused, since research suggests that their linguistic capabilities may limit the extent to which they can make a full and clear disclosure. This is problematic from a safeguarding perspective since the recipeient of the disclosure may not fully appreciate what the child is trying to disclosure, or even that a disclosure of sexual abuse is being made. Using data provided by NSPCC ChildLine, my research aims to determine the language and linguistic strategies used by children and young people during initial disclosures so that trusted adults can more readily recognise when a disclosure is being made. A full list of my publications can be found on my Manchester Metropolitan University home-page and on academia.edu, and you can hear me talking about my research on this podcast. Please contact me if you are interested in research collaboration or postgraduate level research opportunities in forensic linguistics (MPhil and PhD).
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DR SAMUEL LARNER
DR SAMUEL LARNER